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N. C. Wyeth (1882-1945)
Indian and Panther
1904
Charcoal and crayon on paper, 17 1/2 x 23 in. (44.4 x 58.4 cm)
Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art

NCW NUMBER
1474
TITLE
Indian and Panther
ALTERNATE TITLE(S)
Indian and Mountain Lion
MEDIUM
Charcoal and crayon on paper
INSCRIPTION(S), LABEL(S)
Lower right: John Bancroft, Jr. / from N. C. Wyeth / '07
DATE
1904
PROVENANCE
The artist to 1907; John Bancroft, Jr., Wilmington, DE; (?); (Knoedler Galleries, New York, NY); private collection, CT; (Peter Davidson, NY, by 1982); (Hirschl & Adler, 1984-1986 and returned to Peter Davidson); (American Illustrators Gallery, NY, 1991)
EXHIBITION HISTORY
Marietta, GA, 1998, no nos., illus. in color, unpaginated
INITIAL USE
Sketch for Howard Pyle's composition class
REFERENCES
"Howard Pyle, Diversity in Depth, Notes from Howard Pyle's Monday Night Lectures, June-November 1904," Delaware Art Museum, 1973, p. 23-24
CURATORIAL COMMENT
"Now, Mr. Wyeth, this lacks just a little of being a great composition. In the main it is well told, but you have been a little overdramatic with your figures. A panther crouching to spring on his victim is not possessed of passion but merely a desire to eat. He is cool, calculating, hungry. ... When you throw your own self into the animal you make him human. You should consider him being different from yourself." "The action of the Indian, too, is overstated. He knows escape is impossible and his only hope lies in meeing the attack. He wouldnot lean back as you have him but would instinctively brace himself for the blow." The criticism of Howard Pyle, as reproduced in "Notes from Howard Pyle's Monday Night Lectures, June-November 1904," printed in "Howard Pyle, Diversity and Depth," Wilmington, DE: Wilmingtons Society of the Fine Arts, 1973, ps. 23-24. Members of the Bancroft family of Wilmington were collectors and supporters of the arts in general and of the Pyle school in particular.
IMAGE SOURCE
photography directly from artwork
PHOTO CREDIT
Paulus Leeser, photographer; Courtesy of Nicholas Wyeth, Inc.